Mrs. Eddy: The Biography of a Virginal Mind

Mrs. Eddy / DakinMrs. Eddy: The Biography of a Virginal Mind, Edwin Franden Dakin

 


I just finished reading the Dakin book, which I highly recommend. I learned that one of the big things in the early Christian Science movement was the ability to ‘demonstrate supply.’ The New York church had a special borrowing room so that people who had not yet ‘demonstrated supply’ could borrow things and appear to have done so. I came away with the impression Mary Baker Eddy didn’t want to hurt anyone, she just wanted to be Someone Important.


Dakin’s biography of Mary Baker Eddy is based on contemporaneous sources, and is absolutely jaw-dropping! Does a great job of showing how Christian Science was a money making operation for Eddy, and how dishonest and manipulative she was. I now understand why The Mother Church launched a campaign of intimidation against publishers and booksellers to suppress it.

– Bruce


Dakin’s biography is well-sourced, and refreshingly insightful especially into Mary Baker Eddy’s early life, experiences, and mental-health issues, many of which, as I look at it all in its totality, largely frame her so-called ‘discovery’ of Christian Science, and how and why it developed as it did. Historical figures in the movement who previously were portrayed as villains in the ‘authorized’ history I used to read as a Christian Scientist, are presented here in a different, more balanced light. Eddy was a capricious woman who quickly wore out friendships and welcomes throughout her life, and those who no longer suited her were summarily vilified, as was anyone who dared to stand up to her.

– Jeremy


Reviews from other ex-Christian Scientists on the internet

The Healing Revelations of Mary Baker Eddy: The Rise and Fall of Christian Science

The Healing Revelations of Mary Baker Eddy: The Rise and Fall of Christian Science, by Martin Gardner.

The Healing Revelations of Mary Baker Eddy: The Rise and Fall of Christian Science, Martin Gardner

 


In this light-hearted book, you will learn things that you never knew about the history of the Christian Science church (such as the memorial pyramid that used to mark MBE’s birthplace). Gardner summarizes the various plagiarism charges and devotes a chapter each to Dickey and Twain, etc. At the end, Gardner explains how CS fits into the context of other New Thought movements.

– Beth


This book is worth picking up if for no other reason than to read the jaw-dropping chapter detailing the memoirs of Adam Dickey, who served as Mary Baker Eddy’s private secretary from 1908 until her death in 1910.

– Linda P.


Reviews from other ex-Christian Scientists on the internet

The Unseen Shore: Memories of a Christian Science Childhood

UnseenShoreThe Unseen Shore: Memories of a Christian Science Childhood, Thomas Simmons

 


I gave a copy of The Unseen Shore to the senior pastor of our Presbyterian Church sometime in the early 90s. In our monthly newsletter this very erudite man stated his opinion that it was the best theological text of that year.

– Marion


This memoir was a bit too cerebral for me, but I’ve talked to others who liked it. Weaving poetry and philosophy throughout this pilgrimage, Simmons offers an intelligent, literate account of his personal ‘dark night of the soul.’ Ultimately, he acknowledges life and the material as real—despite imperfections—rather than as the illusory, spiritual manifestations of his Christian Science youth.

– Beth


This book was one of the first I read around the time of my mother’s death. I related to his childhood pain and was touched at his descriptions of relating to his child after leaving Christian Science. I identified with that; my children have been my reality, also. This is a very honest book. He writes about a journey which is not for the faint-hearted. One formerly CS friend of mine couldn’t finish it, as it raised many painful memories.

– Katharine


The Last Strawberry

last_strawberry_cover

The Last Strawberry, Rita Swan


Totally devastating. Brought me to my knees.

– Elizabeth


Powerful and revealing. How could people who love their children not get them medical care? This books shows how.

– Ashley


Short, well-written, very touching, but at the same time it was difficult to read because of its subject matter which hit a bit too close to home. It stirred memories of my own time in Christian Science, and dealing with Christian Science practitioners, a class of ‘professionals’, if you want to call them that, who often and routinely cross personal and professional boundaries, at least in my own experience, and the experience of the author of this memoir.

– Jeremy


I’m disgusted by the behavior of the practitioners before and after Matthew’s death and by their petty rivalries. Hardly an ounce of charity in the lot. I’m also disgusted by the church’s fraudulent claim that it had healed another case of meningitis, when in fact the other child had the more benign form of the disease and had been treated in a hospital.

– Steve


An utterly heartbreaking but beautiful tribute to Rita’s son Matthew, who died while under Christian Science ‘care.’ This little book packs a powerful punch and clearly illustrates the utter coldness, denial, and futility of Christian Science.

– Madeleine


fathermothergod: My Journey Out of Christian Science

FatherMotherGodfathermothergod: My Journey Out of Christian Science, Lucia Greenhouse


I downloaded fathermothergod and read the whole thing today. I finished it a couple of hours ago and have been an emotional, blubbering mess since then. I was identifying with so much of what she said and feeling secure in my gut feeling that Christian Science isn’t the Truth.

– Laura


A moving, powerful, and beautifully written work. The author convincingly recreates the bizarre dynamics of a Christian Science household: the jargon with its euphemisms and absolutist declarations of Truth, the denial and suppression of facts and feelings, the secrecy, the mistrust directed toward non-CS family members. When her mother becomes gravely ill, Lucia is frustrated in every attempt she makes to break through the intransigence of CS belief. Tragic and infuriating.

– Bruce


fathermothergod is extremely readable for non-Christian Scientists as well. Three of my friends and my therapist read it at my request, and their sudden understanding and compassion for me has been unexpected and extremely welcome.

– Valerie


This book was the easiest to read and a great primer for the uninitiated. It was so easy and friendly, while describing the horrors we all shared. This book was the easiest to read and a great primer for the uninitiated. It was so easy and friendly, while describing the horrors we all shared. I loved it, but it was tough to take. My own mom used to lie in bed, writhing in pain and screaming out to God on a regular basis. Damn, scratch the surface and you get so many revelations about things you have yet to really deal with.

– Katie J.


I read fathermothergod over the weekend. It was difficult, but gripping. I cried more than once.

– Cara


fathermothergod was the first critical book about Christian Science that I read after leaving the faith. Its pages stirred echoes of my own experience — from her recounting of childhood memories to her experience with her mother’s illness and death. I read it in about two days; I found it hard to put it down.

– Jeremy